MA LCS Course Offerings

 
MA in LITERARY/CULTURAL STUDIES
Graduate Level Courses
 
Lit 201   Methods of Literary and Cultural Research
An introduction to graduate literary research, criticism, and general scholarship. The study of scholarly resources, techniques, bibliography, methods, scholarly publishing, text editing, library use, fieldwork, textual criticism, theory of literary research and stylistic analysis, as they pertain to scholarship.
 
Lit 202   Literary Theory and Cultural Research
An introduction to the history of the basic issues in literary theory and criticism from the Greeks to the present. Provides a historical outline of the concerns in literary studies such as the problematic of the category of “Literature,” its function and nature, literary explication, textual interpretation and evaluation, modes of representation, Canon formation, and the social and institutional forces that constitute the development of the “literary establishment.” 
 
Lit 211   Critical Theory I: Introduction to Critical Theory
An introduction to the major issues informing the 20th century critical debates in the US and Europe. Traces the evolution of literary and critical issues along historical and aesthetic conjectures. Coverage in the range of contemporary social, psychoanalytic, and literary theories and their confluence in literary studies.
 
Lit 212   Critical Theory II: The Study of Text, Form, and Structure
A study of the central assumptions, implications, problems, convergences, and divergences of Russian Formalism, Anglo-American New Criticism, and Structuralism. Focuses on the major theorists and their critical texts.
 
Lit 213   Critical Theory III: The Study of the Subject in Literature and Criticism
The study of the central assumptions, implications, problems, convergences, and divergences of reception theory, psychoanalytic theory, and feminist theory. Focuses on the major theorists and their critical texts.
  
Lit 215   Practical Criticism
An intensive study of representative literary theories and their application to concrete works.
 
Lit 216   Genre Studies I: Introduction to Genre Studies
An introduction to the study of the conventional distinctions among the major literary types and subtypes in the Western world, but also in the Non-Western world, and the aesthetic characteristics and theories that inform their operation and evolution. Emphasizes the formal and dominant classifications and their development into the present types called “genre.”
 
Lit 217   Genre Studies II: Genre and the Western Classics
A study of the origin and variety of literary types (i.e., epic, Arthurian romance, morality plays, etc.) from the Ancient Greek and Roman period, Medieval and Renaissance, in the history of Western Literature and criticism. Focus is on the “classical” texts or so-called Western “masterpieces” (i.e. Greek Tragedy/Comedy, Beowulf, Chaucer, The Faerie Queen, etc.).
 
Lit 218   Genre Studies III: Genre and the Development of Modern Classics
A study of the development of distinct literary types and subtypes (i.e., Restoration comedy, satire, naturalist plays, lyric poetry, etc.) in Western Literature and criticism from the 18th, 19th, and the 20th centuries (i.e., British Romantic poetry, 19th century Continental European novel, 20thcentury American short story, etc.) following conventional periodization and classification. Focus is on the representative texts of the periods under study which develop towards or fall largely under the “Modern Age.”
 
Lit 219   Genre Studies IV: Contemporary Modes and Postmodernism
A study of “special” contemporary modes of postmodernism like metafiction, new history, testimonial literature, postmodern romance, etc. Focuses on the development and the current “blurred genres.”
 
Lit 221   Cultural Studies I: Introduction to Cultural Studies
An introduction to the study of cultural texts in the broader perspective of the current theories in social and literary studies, bringing together areas of scholarly inquiry which have been traditionally kept apart. Covers the study of media texts like film, television, radio and popular literature. Focus is on the understanding and appreciation of these varied texts in their interrelatedness with other cultural texts and practices as social and historical constructs.
 
Lit 222   Cultural Studies II: Texts and Textuality
This course studies “texts” (both traditional literary genres and cultural/textual forms like TV, performances, events, etc.). It examines them as cultural practices which construct/constitute meaning. It questions “textuality” or the presumed degree of stability that enables signification.
 
Lit 223   Cultural Studies III: Texts and Contexts                               
This course studies texts as a social field, rather than as an autonomous object of inquiry. It focuses on discursive practices as generated by differences in a complex field of contestation in which issues from textual and contextual relationships challenge and negotiate significance(s) for ascendancy.
 
Lit 224   Cultural Studies IV: Study of Media Texts                            
Surveys a whole variety of media texts as the overall mode of the 20th century. Focuses on how these texts become constituted by and constitutive of the social and aesthetic concerns.      
 
Lit 225   Cultural Studies V: Study of Popular Texts               
A study of a range of popular literatures and cultural forms, including sci-fi texts, modern romances, detective stories, etc. How the current Filipino generations are constituted by and constitutive of these “pop” forms and expressions will be the focus of this course.
 
Lit 226   Folklore I
An introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and methodologies of folklore. The course will outline the definition, formulae, and conventions of folklore and present the basic scholarly approaches to folklore with an emphasis on literary folklore. The course will exemplify the principles of folklore study with numerous examples.
 
Lit 227   Folklore II
A more advanced study of the definition, formulae, and conventions of folklore with concrete examples from field study. The course will emphasize Philippine folklore and the student will be engaged in detailed study of some aspect of Philippine literary folklore.
 
Lit 229.1 Cultural Studies IV: Political Criticism I: Ethnicity and Race      
This course studies the varieties of political criticism that center on ethnicity and race as applied to literary and non-literary texts. It focuses on uncovering the social and cultural assumptions regarding race and ethnicity inscribed in the texts and on the relation between the texts and maintenance of or negotiation for social power.
 
Lit 229.2 Cultural Studies IV: Political Criticism II: Class
This course studies the varieties of political criticism that center on class and ideology as applied to literary and non-literary texts. It focuses on uncovering the social and cultural assumptions regarding class inscribed in the texts and on the relation between the texts and the maintenance of or negotiation for social power.
 
Lit 229.3 Cultural Studies IV: Political Criticism III: Gender                                           
The study of the varieties of political criticism that center on gender as applied to literary and non-literary texts. Focuses on uncovering the social and cultural assumptions regarding gender inscribed in the texts and on the relation between the texts and the maintenance of or negotiations for social power.
 
Lit 231   The Development of Poetry
This is a reading course on representative poets and their selected poems. In particular, the course aims to establish a historico-literary outline of the developments in poetry in relation to form, language, and poetry’s function as a mode for articulating philosophical themes. This course will also explore how the lively, imaginative practice of poetry through the ages has allowed poets to participate in a continuing critical debate about fundamental issues in poetics and the various theories of poetry.
 
Lit 232   Poetry to the 19th Century
A survey of poetry from its earliest beginnings. The course will include Chaucer, Shakespeare and the Renaissance, the neo-classical and Romantic periods.
 
Lit 233   Modern Poetry
An intensive study of representative works and authors of modern poetry. This is a course designed to develop in the student a critical as well as historical approach toward leading – especially seminal – figures in modern poetry.
 
Lit 235   The Poet’s Work
This course involves a detailed study of individual voices in poetry and the deep sources of their writing, their techniques and preferred forms, the schools of thought that they have influenced, the singular experience behind their popular and major poems. This course will present poetry as a method for the disclosure of individual talents and their relationship with tradition and the organic forms. The survey will explore the poet’s sense of tradition, restraint, social responsibility, and concern for elegant communication.
 
Lit 236   Classical Epic
A survey (in translation) of four epics: three of Graeco-roman antiquity (the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer and the Aeneid of Virgil) and one of the Christian Middle Ages (Dante’s Divine Comedy). The focus will be on structure, technique, and human values.
 
Lit 237   Western Epic
A comparative study of selected popular/folk epics in the Western world. The course will cover Beowulf, Dante, Milton, and other European epics.     
 
Lit 241   The Development of Drama                      
An introduction to playwrights and representative plays from Classical Antiquity to the Contemporary era. Works by the likes of Sophocles, Kiyotsugu, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Shaw, Beckett, Duras, and David Henry Huang will be discussed, taking into account the theatrical and symbolic aspects of their plays.
 
Lit 242   Drama to the 19th Century
An intensive study of representative plays and playwrights up to the 19th century.
 
Lit 243   Modern Drama
An intensive study of representative modern plays and playwrights.
 
Lit 245   The Playwright’s Passion               
A study of individual playwrights and their body of works. Stress will be given on the playwright’s distinct contributions to the development of the dramatic genres, the influence of his plays on theater history, their impact on the history of ideas, as well as the particular innovations in staging and acting that these plays have generated.
 
Lit 246   Classical Drama
The course concentrates on the classical drama of the Greeks and Romans: Aeschylus, Sophocles. Euripedes, Seneca, and others.
 
Lit 247   Shakespeare: Tragedies
An introduction to Shakespearean drama taken as a whole, discussing the theatrical as well as the symbolic aspects of his plays.
 
Lit 248   Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories
A study of Shakespeare’s comedies including what are sometimes called the “Last Plays.” Emphasis will center on the texts as poetical drama although historical and biographical materials will be used where relevant.
Emphasizes the formal and dominant classifications and their development into the present types called “genre.”
 
Lit 249   Asian Drama
An introduction course to Asian Drama and a survey of representative works from both classical and modern Asian theater.
 
Lit 251   The Development of Fiction                       
This is a reading course on representative fictionists and their selected novels and short stories. The course presents a historico-literary survey of major issues in fiction studies as well as the fundamental debates, arguments, problems, and achievements in this genre. The reading survey aims to enhance the theoretical part of the course and provides the students with a lively reading experience illustrating how major themes in the history of ideas are treated creatively in fiction.
  
Lit 252   The Novel to the 19th Century
An intensive study of the development of the novel from its origins up to the 19th century.
  
Lit 253   The Modern Novel
An intensive study of representative modern novels and novelists.
  
Lit 255   The Fiction Writer and His/Her Work
This course focuses on the body of works of an author or a group of authors. It involves studies on the author’s milieu, the ideas, problems, and influences in the writing of his/her work, and the contributions he/she has made to the development of fiction itself.
 
Lit 256   Creative Writing I: Fiction
This creative writing workshop will be usually under the direction of a guest writer, and will include guided writing, discussion and analyses of the students’ craft of writing fiction, and their original short stories, novellas, and novels.
 
Lit 257   Creative Writing II: Poetry and Drama
This creative writing workshop, usually conducted by a guest writer, will provide a forum for the discussion and investigation of the students’ poetic and dramatic works.
 
Lit 258   Creative Writing III: Non-Fiction
This creative writing workshop will include the composition and analyses of non-fictional works. The students will produce essays, journals, autobiographical essays, and travelogues.
 
Lit 259   Creative Writing IV: Translation
The creative writing workshop will be usually under the direction of a guest writer and will include guided writing, discussion and analysis of the students’ work in the fields of poetry, fiction, non-fiction and translation.
 
Lit 261   Survey of Philippine Literatures
An introduction to Philippine Literature and literary scholarship. Provides an overview of the historical development of Philippine literature, covering representative texts of periods, movements and issues. Introduces the students to the various fields of research, areas of study and range of scholarship in Philippine literature.
 
Lit 262   Survey of Regional Literature
A survey of regional literatures in the Philippines other than those written in English or Tagalog, foregrounding literary texts from the non-Tagalog regions written in the different regional languages.  Focus is on the understanding and appreciation of these texts, as well as their contributions to Philippine Literature.
 
Lit 263   Philippine Literature in Spanish
An intensive study of representative writing and writers in Spanish.
 
Lit 264   Philippine Literature in English
A survey of Philippine writing in English, covering illustrative Filipino texts from 1900s to the present.  Focuses on the main trends in the aesthetic and social concerns of Filipino writers.
 
Lit 265   Philippine Literary Theory and Criticism
A survey of the history and development of literary theory and criticism in the Philippines in any of the languages. Study of the main trends and the major currents in theorizing and practice of criticism in the country.
 
Lit 267   Philippine Drama
An introductory study of traditional forms and representative examples of Philippine Drama from Spanish regime to the present.
 
Lit 268   Philippine Novel in English
A survey of the Philippine novel in English from its beginnings to the contemporary novel.
 
Lit 269   Philippine Epic
The course will review the basic principles of both Western and Eastern epics and their applications and variations in various Philippine epics. A representative selection of Philippine epics will be required reading.
 
Lit 271   Survey of the Literature of Decolonization
A survey of the major contemporary literary and critical texts in the so-called Third World countries.  Emphasizes the contributions of these countries in the understanding and appreciation of World Literature. Focuses on the literatures of decolonization and resistance.
 
Lit 272   African Literature
A study of the history and development of literary and critical texts in Africa. Traces the social and aesthetic concerns of African and Middle-Eastern countries which shape their literature in relation to others.
 
Lit 273   Asian Literature
A survey of Asian Literature from India and Southeast Asia, both classical and modern.
 
Lit 274   Latin American Literature
A study of the history and development of literary and critical texts in Latin America. Traces the social and aesthetic concerns of Latin American countries which shape their literatures in relation to others.
 
Lit 275   Oriental Literature
A survey of classical and modern literature from Japan, China, and Korea.
 
Lit 276   Indian Literature
Prose or verse will be studied in English translation to see the effect of modernization on Asian literature. A specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered.
 
Lit 278   Philippine Literature in Relation to Southeast Asian Literature               
This course examines the Philippines within the context of Southeast Asia. Literatures from the region will be compared with one another. Of special interest are their articulations of modernity, colonialism, nationalism, and identity as “Southeast Asian.”
 
Lit 281   Survey of Western Literature
Surveys the development of a wide range of literary texts using illustrative materials from the “Western” world.
 
Lit 282   European Literature
A study of the narrative tradition of Spain and Europe during the 19th century, thus providing the basis for a literary approach and evaluation of Rizal’s Noli and Fili. Literary and intellectual traditions for discussion include the enlightenment, romanticism, and realism. Readings include Voltaire, Balzac, Swift, and Spanish authors Larra, Galdos, and Blasco-Ibañez.
 
Lit 283   British Literature
An introduction to British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the first half of the 20th century, for a rudimentary grasp of the major issues attending the development of British literature. Authors discussed include Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Joyce, and Forster.
 
Lit 284   American Literature
Outlines the development of literatures in North America in a wide variety of genres.
 
Lit 285   Classical Literature
An intensive study of representative works and authors during the Age of Enlightenment.
 
Lit 287   Renaissance Literature
An intensive study of representative works and authors during the Humanistic Movement.
 
Lit 289   Romantic Literature
An intensive Study of representative works and authors during the Age of Romanticism.
 
Lit 291   Literature and Ideas I
This course will study the themes and literary trends in prosaic fiction. Short stories, novellas, and novels of different eras and continents will be explored.
 
Lit 292   Literature and Ideas II: Poetry and Drama
This course will study the themes and trends in poetry and drama. Poetry and plays of different eras and continents will be explored.
 
Lit 293   Literature and Ideas III: Cultural Studies
This course will study the relationship between literature and the trends and movements of history and culture. Texts from different periods and contents will be explored.
 
Lit 294   Literature and Ideas IV: Non-Fiction
A close examination of themes and ideas as embodied in literary works. An individual topic or author is chosen at the beginning of each course.
 
Lit 295   Special Topics in Literary Research
A close examination of themes and ideas as embodied in literary works. An individual topic or author is chosen at the beginning of each course.
 
Lit 298/299  Independent Research I and II
The student engages in literary research under the guidance of a mentor and writes and defends a literary research paper.