Undergrad Electives

1ST Semester SY 2018-2019
 
ENLIT 21 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY AND CULTURAL STUDIES
TTH, 8:00-9:30AM (For Lit Majors Only)
Dr. Mary Thomas
ENLIT 21 is an introduction to the established critical traditions and the characteristic objects/methods of literary and cultural studies. It maps the paradigmatic shifts, from the 'linguistic turn' to the 'cultural turn', that transformed the discipline in the late-modern period and explores the consequent rethinking of the conventional disciplinary categories of author, genre, historical period, and style, including literary production, reception aesthetics, canon critique, and the worlds/contexts of literature. In the process, students are introduced to the most exemplary and consequential studies and theorizations/critiques of world and Philippine literatures.
 
LIT 101.1 ADVANCED EXPOSITORY WRITING: ADVANCED ARGUMENTATION
WED, 6:00-9:00pm
Dr. Oscar Campomanes
This class consists of two parts: a) sessions devoted to a discussion of exemplary texts in historiographic, literary, cultural, and Philippine criticism; and b) a series of pre-professionalization workshops devoted to producing a mock-up scholarly journal in which the students engage in simulated processes of reviewing and publishing their own critical projects. The readings expose students to models of critical writing and to provide a sense of the range of creative possibilities available to them as aspiring or practicing critics and scholars. The workshops and the journal project are designed to train them in the practical business of producing and preparing their own critical writing for publication and to introduce them to the standard practices of peer review, editing, and revision in academic publishing. 
 
LIT 112.1 CLASSICAL TO MODERN LITERARY CRITICISM
MWF, 2:00-3:00pm (For Lit Majors Only)
Dr. Jocelyn Martin
This class is an introduction to literary criticism from five Western periods: the Classical Age, the Middle Ages and the Rennaissance, the Age of Enlightenment, the Romantic Period, and the Modern Age.
 
LIT 126.1 WESTERN LITERATURE I: THE ANCIENT WORLD TO THE RENAISSANCE
Section A –     WED, 5:00-8:00pm (Lit Majors Only)
                         Dr. Vincenz Serrano
Section B –      MWF, 3:00-4:00pm
                         Dr. Edward-David Ruiz
Section C –      MWF, 4:00-5:00pm
                          Mr. Ramon Vicente Sunico
A survey of the literature of the Western World produced between the 10th century BC and the late 17th century, including representative poetry, drama, prose fiction, and non-fiction from the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.
 
LIT 127.1 THIRD WORLD LITERATURE I
Section A –      TTH, 8:00-9:30am (Lit Majors Only)
                          Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.
Section B –      TTH, 12:30-2:00pm
                          Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.
Section C –      TTH, 2:00-3:30pm
             Ms. Annette Soriano
A survey of African, Asian, and Latin American literature from antiquity to the 1700’s, focusing on works selected primarily for their ability to illustrate the strong influence of colonialism.
 
LIT 136/FA-CW 101.2: WRITING WORKSHOP: FICTION
Section A -      MWF, 12:00-1:00pm (4 slots only)
Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
Section B -      TTH, 11:00-12:30pm
                        Mr. Christopher Mitch Cerda
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished fictionist. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 138/FA-CW 102.2 CREATIVE WRITING III: NON-FICTION
Section A -      T, 5:00-8:00pm (5 slots only)
Mr. Alexis Augusto Abola
LIT 138 is a creative writing workshop conducted under the direction of a guest writer. The course guides the writing of, discusses, and analyzes the students’ original works of non-fiction such as personal essays, journals, and travelogues.
 
LIT 161: PHILIPPINE LITERATURE IN ENGLISH                  
MWF1 4:00-5:00pm
Mr. Francis Sollano
A study of Philippine literature originally written in English from the early 1900s to the present, locating it within the study of Philippine literature recorded and written in the different languages of the Filipino people.
 
LIT 172.5: ASIAN LITERATURE III: MODERN SOUTH KOREAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
MWF, 2:00-3:00pm
Dr. Alona Guevarra
This course explores fiction produced in South Korea after 1945 up to the early 2000s when the country economically developed. Through close reading and contextualizing of short stories, novellas and novels by authors like Chae Man-Sik, Cho Se-Hui, Yi Mun-yǒl and Kim Young-Ha, the course shows complex changes in South Korea from its establishment as a democratic republic to its global influence today as a cultural center in Asia and a key player in global economy. Focus is on topics like the development of nationalism and identity as well as the country’s changes within the context of transnationalism and globalization.
 
LIT 191.7 THE DEVELOPMENT OF FICTION
SAT, 8:00-11:00am
Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
A reading course on representative fictionists and their selected novels and short stories. It presents a historic-literary survey of major issues in fiction studies and the fundamental debates, arguments, problems, and achievements in this genre.
 
LIT 192.2/FA 103.2: CREATIVE WRITING II: POETRY
WED, 5:00-8:00pm (5 slots only)
Dr. Allan Popa
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished poet. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 192.6/FA 136.1: THE DEVELOPMENT OF DRAMA
TTH, 9:30-11:00am (10 slots only)
Mr. Glenn Mas
An introduction to playwrights and representative plays from Classical Antiquity to the Contemporary era. Works by the likes of Sophocles, Kiyotsugu, Marlowe, Shakepeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Shaw, Beckett, Duras, and David Henry Huang are discussed, taking into account the theatrical and symbolic aspects of the plays.
 
LIT 193.23/FA 114.2: WRITING SEMINAR: DRAMA
TH, 12:30-3:30pm (5 slots only)
Mr. Glenn Mas
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished playwright. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 193.37: LITERATURE AND IDEAS III: THE PHILIPPINE TELESERYE
MWF, 9:00-10:00am
Mr. Louie Jon A. Sanchez
This course explores the contemporary soap opera called the “teleserye” in Philippine television in contemporary times. Using cultural studies and media studies frameworks, the exploration is historical, poetic, and aesthetic in nature, and explicates the development of the genre as it was practiced, defined (and re-defined) in the last 30 years, beginning with the return of democratized Philippine television after the 1986 Edsa Revolution, until the most recent "Korean turn." This course is designed for literature majors and minors who wish to engage in Filipino popular cultural texts and communication majors aiming to deepen their understanding of the genre.
 
LIT 194.8: LITERATURE AND IDEAS IV: TRANSLATION
MWF, 11:00-12:00nn
Dr. Charlie Veric
An introduction to the art and practice of translation, as well as the history of translation theory. The course is divided into three parts, hoping to provide an analysis of the process as well as practical advice for intending translators, namely: the theory of translation, the practice of translation, and the appreciation of literary translations as texts. In covering these issues, the course stresses the importance of understanding the unfamiliar and the need to see human experience from as many angles.