TENTATIVE COURSE OFFERINGS FOR FIRST SEMESTER, SY 2018-2019

June 06, 2018
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
School of Social Sciences, Loyola Schools
Ateneo de Manila University
 
TENTATIVE UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS
First Semester, SY 2018-2019
 
CATALOGUE
NUMBER
COURSE DESCRIPTION
SA 21 Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology
Check AISIS for instructors and schedules.
 
This course introduces the different perspectives of sociology and anthropology with reference to the Philippine context. Focus is on how forces of culture, social structure, and social institutions influence human behaviour and how individuals acting as a group reproduce and transform these same social forces.
SA 102 Sociological Analysis
Dr. Liza L. Lim
 
This course discusses the concepts, approaches, and themes of sociological inquiry; beginning with the philosophical origins of sociology and ending with its ascendancy as a major social science discipline. The course discusses how these approaches view social reality from different yet complementary points of view.
SA 103 Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences
Dr. Enrique Niño Leviste
 
This research methodology course presents the concepts and tools of quantitative social research—particularly the survey—for gathering data. Students learn to design and conduct a survey, analyze the data, interpret the results, and present the conclusions.
SA 109 Theories of Development (Juniors and Seniors only)
Dr. Anna Marie Karaos
 
This course is a survey and analysis of socio-cultural, political, and economic theories of development. Topics include theoretical models such as modernization, dependency, world-system and neo-Marxist/ neo-Weberican versions; neo-functionalist theories; governance/ democratization models; and postmodernist critiques.
SA 119 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Dr. Jose Jowel P. Canuday
 
This course is a study of the concept of “culture” and patterns of behavior. The course presents the practical aspect of learning to understand why people think and act the way they do in order to make sense of both one's self and society.
SA 126 Social Inequality (Juniors & Seniors only)
Dr. Elizabeth Uy Eviota
 
This course studies inequality as a matter of patterned structures, not as something randomly distributed between individuals. The course looks at inequalities between nations and between groups, and examines the intersections of these inequalities and how controlled and exploited groups respond to social inequality.
SA 132 Law, Culture, and Society: Justice and Human Rights (Juniors and Seniors only)
Dr. Mary Racelis
 
People’s concepts of justice, or katarungan, are examined along with equity and fairness (pagkamakatarungan). Simultaneously studied is the process of people’s moving through increasing levels of awareness of rights starting with “wishing” (sana) to “should” (dapat) to rights (karapatan) and human rights (mga karapatang pantao). Cross-cultural evidence of people’s actual experiences of what they define as injustice/justice and deprivation of/access to rights, and the actions they take to rectify injustice and human rights violations are analyzed. While attention to civil and political rights is considered (impunity in extra-judicial killings, incarceration, torture, involuntary disappearance, genocide), greater attention is given to people’s approaches to social, cultural, economic, environmental, and collective rights. Insights from ethnographic data featuring cultural values and traditions are compared with formal ordinances, codes of conduct, executive orders, national legislation, the Constitution and international conventions, especially the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Fieldwork will focus on specific groups’ experiences of injustice and their efforts to overcome violations of their rights, for example, the drug war, evictions and involuntary relocation of urban informal settlers, trafficking of women and children, labor exploitation, migration, LGBT discrimination, displacement of indigenous people, farmers, fisherfolk, and disaster and war-affected populations.
SA 138 Political Economy of Environmental Resources
Fr. Albert Alejo, S.J.
 
This course is a study of the bases of environmental resource use/access patterns and its socio- political consequences from the perspective of the political economy. These issues are located within the context of the globalization of modern socio- political and economic life.
SA 141 Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia
Dr. Fernando N. Zialcita
 
This course introduces the diverse environments, peoples, and cultures of Southeast Asia, bringing various cultural strands together to trace relationships and similarities across political boundaries. The course explores fundamental issues affecting the lives of the people of both riverine and maritime Southeast Asia.
SA 147.1 New! War and Capitalism: Political Economy of Social Conflict (Juniors and Seniors only)
Dr. Elizabeth Uy Eviota
 
Since the second half of the past century and into the present, there have been numerous international social, economic, and political conflicts which have led to war. This course surveys these “hot” wars (as opposed to the Cold War) with focus on the intimate connections between economic exploitation and militarism and the assymetric nature of these wars. The discussion covers the issues leading up to these wars, including the justifications for these wars, such as propaganda and ideological campaigns. Associated issues will include the gendered, racial/ethnic, and ecological dimensions of these wars as well as the role of international agencies.
SA 157 Introduction to Cultural Heritage
Dr. Fernando Zialcita
 
Cultural heritage is an asset in the Global competition between nations, cities, and ethnicities. Heritage, whether tangible (e.g. architecture, paintings) or intangible (e.g. dance, games, cooking), builds up pride and identity. Heritage enlivens modernity because it re-invents traditional styles to create unique, up-to- date global fashions. To conserve heritage, we should foster state-and-community partnerships to foster community-based tourism and to develop unique niches for heritage products in the global market. Activities will be a field trip, organizing a culinary heritage event centering on a province, and fieldwork in teams.
Soc 101 New! Fundamentals of Sociology
Dr. Enrique Niño Leviste
 
An introduction to the central concepts, perspectives, and practices of sociology as the systematic study of society. It shows how three major social forces—culture, structure, and social institutions—influence our thoughts and actions, and how we humans, acting as individuals and members of groups, reproduce and transform these same social forces.
SOAN 180.3 New! Sp. Topics in Socio-Anthro: Media and Social Media
Dr. Joson A. Lorenzana
 
Using anthropological and sociological approaches, the course examines media as institution, practice and experience. It focuses on how media in the
contemporary world constitute social and cultural formations and shape politics. Ethnographies of traditional and digital media from different societies and periods provide a comparative perspective to critically understand the ways in which people produce, consume, engage, inhabit, use and incorporate media into everyday life.
SocSci 110 Introduction to Global Studies (Contemporary World)
Dr. Enrique Niño Leviste
 
This course provides an overview of global studies, and globalization in particular, from the perspective of different social science disciplines. It examines the economic, social, cultural, political, technological, and other transformations that have created an increasing awareness of the interrelationships and interconnectedness of peoples and places around the globe. It analyzes individual and institutional responses to globalization.
 

 


 
 
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
School of Social Sciences, Loyola Schools
Ateneo de Manila University
 
TENTATIVE GRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS
First Semester, SY 2018-2019
 

CATALOGUE
NUMBER
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Anthro 262 / Soc 296
 
Theories of Development
Dr. Anna Marie Karaos
 
This is a survey and analysis of various socio-cultural, political, and economic theories of development. It examines contemporary theoretical frameworks in third world development and social change; introduces a variety of development perspectives and the exposure to current debates in economic and political development issues.
Anthro 275/Soc 275 Origins of Inequality
Dr. Elizabeth Uy Eviota
 
This course discusses inequality as a matter of patterned structures of unequal groups and not as something that is randomly distributed between individuals. The course looks at inequalities between groups with regard to wealth, social status, gender, race/ethnicity, age; as well as inequalities between nation-states.
Anthro 281 / Soc 261
 
History of Sociological Theory/History of Anthropological Theory
Dr. Raul Pertierra
 
This is a course on the evolution of major theories of society beginning in the nineteenth century to the contemporary period. Radical changes are discussed for a new understanding and theorization of society and culture.
SA 201 Fundamental Statistics
TBA
 
This course discusses basic concepts and operations of statistics. Focus is on univariate and bivariate measures of association and inferences, and basic multivariate analysis. It introduces students to SPSS for Windows and emphasizes on the understanding and application of statistical concepts in social science situations.
SA 205 Research Methods
Dr. Jose Jowel P. Canuday
 
This is a course on the logic of empirical research in sociology and anthropology. It examines the suitable approaches to a variety of typical research problems; their advantages and limitations; and their translation into specific plans for investigation.
SA 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Dr. Jose Jowel P. Canuday
 
This course provides a multi-faceted perspective of humanity through the discussion of various human activities, attitudes and beliefs that revolve around economic and political life, family and kinship, and those that result in social/culture change.
SA 211 Introduction to Sociological Perspectives
Dr. Liza Lim
 
This course is an introduction to the classical and contemporary sociological theories. Topics include the role of theories in social science research; influential schools of thought in the sociological discipline; and the context within which they emerge.
SA 229 Current Issues in Social Policy and Planning: Justice and Human Rights
Dr. Mary Racelis
 
People’s concepts of justice, or katarungan, are examined along with equity and fairness (pagkamakatarungan). Simultaneously studied is the process of people’s moving through increasing levels of awareness of rights starting with “wishing” (sana) to “should” (dapat) to rights (karapatan) and human rights (mga karapatang pantao). Cross-cultural evidence of people’s actual experiences of what they define as injustice/justice and deprivation of/access to rights, and the actions they take to rectify injustice and human
rights violations are analyzed. While attention to civil and political rights is considered (impunity in extra-judicial killings, incarceration, torture, involuntary disappearance, genocide), greater attention is given to people’s approaches to social, cultural, economic, environmental, and collective rights. Insights from ethnographic data featuring cultural values and traditions are compared with formal ordinances, codes of conduct, executive
orders, national legislation, the Constitution and international conventions, especially the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Fieldwork will focus on specific groups’ experiences of injustice and their efforts to overcome violations of their rights, for example, the drug war, evictions and involuntary relocation of urban informal settlers, trafficking of women and children, labor
exploitation, migration, LGBT discrimination, displacement of indigenous people, farmers, fisherfolk, and disaster and war-affected populations.
SA 234 Political Economy of Natural Resources
Fr. Albert Alejo, S.J.
 
This course deals with natural resource management as a terrain of struggle among various stakeholders in society. The course examines how policies on environmental utilization and protection are shaped by the competing interests of the business sector, the state, the civil society, and the communities.
SA 239 Risk and Resilience - Focus on Climate Disasters and Humanitarian Action
Dr. Emma Porio
 
Urbanization, development, land-use decisions, and social/political policy dynamics have increased the risk and vulnerability of societies to natural and man-made disasters. Social-political and economic processes/interventions designed to reduce social vulnerabilities and increase their resilience also reconfigure the disaster management cycle from mitigation, preparation, response and recovery. This course examines how the societal construction
of risk, vulnerability and resilience intersects with development initiatives and disaster planning/policy efforts to reduce social vulnerabilities, and reconfigure the initiatives of communities/groups to increase as well as promote resilience and reduce their own vulnerabilities.
SOAN 280.3 New! Sp. Topics in Socio-Anthro: Media and Social Media
Dr. Joson A. Lorenzana
 
Using anthropological and sociological approaches, the course examines media as institution, practice and experience. It focuses on how media in the
contemporary world constitute social and cultural formations and shape politics. Ethnographies of traditional and digital media from different societies and periods provide a comparative perspective to critically understand the ways in which people produce, consume, engage, inhabit, use and incorporate media into everyday life.
Soc 247.1 New! War and Capitalism: Political Economy of Social Conflict
Dr. Elizabeth Uy Eviota
 
Since the second half of the past century and into the present, there have been numerous international social, economic, and political conflicts which have led to war. This course surveys these “hot” wars (as opposed to the Cold War) with focus on the intimate connections between economic exploitation and militarism and the assymetric nature of these wars. The discussion covers the issues leading up to these wars, including the justifications for these wars, such as propaganda and ideological campaigns. Associated issues will include the gendered, racial/ethnic, and ecological dimensions of these wars as well as the role of international agencies.
 

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