“Mooting” prepares ALS students for court experience

July 14, 2016

There are no theatrical drapes or stage lighting but without a doubt, the courtroom is a lawyer’s stage — a platform where one’s ability to win a legal argument is tested. A court environment can be intimidating so it is crucial for lawyers to boost their mental agility. For law students, one way to hone their written and oral advocacy is through moot court exercises 
 
A moot court is a simulation of court proceedings. It entails drafting memorials (written submissions) and presentation of oral arguments.  At the Ateneo Law School (ALS), students engage in mooting activities throughout the academic year.

Moot court exercises allow law students to practice their written and oral advocacy.

 
According to Atty. Tanya Lat, ALS Program Officer for Formation (Social Programs) and faculty member, 1st year students participate in 2 moot court activities:  the Sta. Maria Cup - Persons and Family Relations Moot Court and the Legal Technique and Logic Moot Court.  Second year students join the Public International Law Moot Court.
 
“At present, not all law students are required to participate in a moot court activity. In time, however, the ultimate objective is to have at least all 1st year students go through this kind of exercise,” Lat said.
 
ALS students who want to further sharpen their mental stamina join the Ateneo Society of International Law (ASIL), the school’s moot court society.
 
“ASIL actively recruits and trains law students from all year levels to become competitive mooters. That being said, there is no minimum year level required to compete,” said Liane Candelario, a 4th year ALS student and ASIL president.  Incoming ASIL members must go through the Mickey Colayco International Moot Court Competition (Colayco Cup).
 
“ASIL membership, and by extension – eligibility to compete in moot court competitions, is attained by competing in the Colayco Cup,” Candelario said.
 
ASIL members join various international moot court matches - from the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition (Jessup), the largest moot court contest in the world to ELSA Moot Court Competition,   a simulation of a panel hearing in the World Trade Organization dispute settlement system. 
 
Mooting requires a lot of hard work and dedication, especially for the intensive legal research.  Team members must be able to draft a legal theory to address the problem/ issue at hand, Candelario said. During the oral rounds, speakers are “trained to deliver their legal theory with respect to the issues assigned to them.”
Given its demanding and competitive nature, Candelario admitted that mooting a great way to teach law students the “value of hard work, discipline, and time management.”
 
“Law school teaches us the law in theory. Moot court allows us law students to practice it by being given the chance to simulate the role of actual counsels.  It provides a wholistic experience in both theory and practice of the law,” Candelario said.
 

News Archive

  • “Mooting” prepares ALS students for court experience
    Thursday, July 14, 2016

    There are no theatrical drapes or stage lighting but without a doubt, the courtroom is a lawyer’s stage — a platform where one’s ability to win a legal argument is tested. A court environment can be intimidating so it is crucial for lawyers to boost their mental agility. For law students, one way to hone their written and oral advocacy is through moot court exercises 
     
    A moot court is a simulation of court proceedings. It entails drafting memorials (written submissions) and presentation of oral arguments.  At the Ateneo Law School (ALS), students engage in mooting activities throughout the academic year.

    Moot court exercises allow law students to practice their written and oral advocacy.

     
    According to Atty. Tanya Lat, ALS Program Officer for Formation (Social Programs) and faculty member, 1st year students participate in 2 moot court activities:  the Sta. Maria Cup - Persons and Family Relations Moot Court and the Legal Technique and Logic Moot Court.  Second year students join the Public International Law Moot Court.
     
    “At present, not all law students are required to participate in a moot court activity. In time, however, the ultimate objective is to have at least all 1st year students go through this kind of exercise,” Lat said.
     
    ALS students who want to further sharpen their mental stamina join the Ateneo Society of International Law (ASIL), the school’s moot court society.
     
    “ASIL actively recruits and trains law students from all year levels to become competitive mooters. That being said, there is no minimum year level required to compete,” said Liane Candelario, a 4th year ALS student and ASIL president.  Incoming ASIL members must go through the Mickey Colayco International Moot Court Competition (Colayco Cup).
     
    “ASIL membership, and by extension – eligibility to compete in moot court competitions, is attained by competing in the Colayco Cup,” Candelario said.
     
    ASIL members join various international moot court matches - from the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition (Jessup), the largest moot court contest in the world to ELSA Moot Court Competition,   a simulation of a panel hearing in the World Trade Organization dispute settlement system. 
     
    Mooting requires a lot of hard work and dedication, especially for the intensive legal research.  Team members must be able to draft a legal theory to address the problem/ issue at hand, Candelario said. During the oral rounds, speakers are “trained to deliver their legal theory with respect to the issues assigned to them.”
    Given its demanding and competitive nature, Candelario admitted that mooting a great way to teach law students the “value of hard work, discipline, and time management.”
     
    “Law school teaches us the law in theory. Moot court allows us law students to practice it by being given the chance to simulate the role of actual counsels.  It provides a wholistic experience in both theory and practice of the law,” Candelario said.