Undergrad Electives

1ST Semester SY 2019-2020
 
 

ENLIT 21 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY AND CULTURAL STUDIES
MWF, 12:00-1:00PM (For Lit Majors Only)
Ms. Andrea Macalino
ENLIT 21 is an introduction to the established critical traditions and the characteristic objects/methods of literary and cultural studies. It maps the paradigmatic shifts, from the 'linguistic turn' to the 'cultural turn', that transformed the discipline in the late-modern period and explores the consequent rethinking of the conventional disciplinary categories of author, genre, historical period, and style, including literary production, reception aesthetics, canon critique, and the worlds/contexts of literature. In the process, students are introduced to the most exemplary and consequential studies and theorizations/critiques of world and Philippine literatures.
 
ENLIT 31 LITERATURES OF THE WESTERN WORLD I: EUROPE
Section A –      WED, 5:00-8:00pm (Lit Majors Only)
                          Ms. Ma. Gabriela Martin
Section B –      MWF, 3:00-4:00pm (For 2nd Year Students Only)
                          Dr. Edward-David Ruiz
Section C –      TTH, 11:00-12:30pm (For 2nd Year Students Only)
                          Mr. Ramon Vicente Sunico
A survey of the literature of the Western World produced between the 10th century BC and the late 17th century, including representative poetry, drama, prose fiction, and non-fiction from the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.
 
ENLIT 41 LITERARY AND CULTURAL THEORY I (For 2nd Year AB Lit (English) Majors Only) /
LIT 112.1 CLASSICAL TO MODERN LITERARY CRITICISM (For 3rd & 4th AB Lit (English) Majors Only)
MWF, 2:00-3:00pm
Dr. Jocelyn Martin
This course introduces the student to literary criticism from the Classical Age, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Age of Enlightenment, the Romantic period, the Modern Age to the 19th and mid-20th centuries which would include psychoanalytic criticism, Structuralism, Marxist criticism, poststructuralism and deconstruction.
 
ENLIT 50 ADVANCED RHETORIC
TTH, 12:30-2:00pm (For Lit Majors Only)
Ms. Emar Ivery Del Campo
This class consists of sessions to discuss exemplary texts in historiographic, literary, cultural, and Philippine criticism and a series of workshops to produce a mock-up scholarly journal in which the students review and publish their own critical projects. The readings expose students to models of critical writing and to provide a sense of the range of creative possibilities available to them as scholars. The workshops and the journal project train them in the practical business of producing and preparing a publishable manuscript and to introduce them to the standard practices of peer review, editing, and revision in academic publishing.
 

LIT 126.1: WESTERN LITERATURE I: THE ANCIENT WORLD TO THE RENAISSANCE
Section A – MWF, 3:00-4:00pm
                    (For 3rd & 4th Year Students)
                    Dr. Edward-David Ruiz
Section B – TTH, 11:00-12:30pm
                    (For 3rd & 4th Year Students)
                    Mr. Ramon Vicente Sunico
A survey of the literature of the Western World produced between the 10th century BC and the late 17th century, including representative poetry, drama, prose fiction, and non-fiction from the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.

 
LIT 127.1 THIRD WORLD LITERATURE I
Section A – TTH, 8:00-9:30am (Lit Majors Only)
                    Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.
Section B – TTH, 12:30-2:00pm
                    Mr. Maximino Pulan, Jr.
Section C – MWF, 2:00-3:00pm
                    Ms. Annette Soriano
A survey of African, Asian, and Latin American literature from antiquity to the 1700’s, focusing on works selected primarily for their ability to illustrate the strong influence of colonialism.
 
LIT 136/FA-CW 101.2: WRITING WORKSHOP: FICTION
Section A -      MWF, 12:00-1:00pm (4 slots only)
                         Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
Section B -      TUE, 2:00-5:00pm (4 slots only)
                         Mr. Carl Joe Javier
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished fictionist. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 138/FA-CW 102.2 CREATIVE WRITING III: NON-FICTION
Section A -      TUE, 8:00-11:00am (4 slots only)
                         Dr. Rica Remedios Santos
Section B -      MWF, 1:00-2:00pm (4 slots only)
                         Mr. Alexis Augusto Abola
LIT 138 is a creative writing workshop conducted under the direction of a guest writer. The course guides the writing of, discusses, and analyzes the students’ original works of non-fiction such as personal essays, journals, and travelogues.
 
ENLIT 127.10 SHAKESPEARE: COMEDIES
(Former Cat. No. LIT 146)
MWF, 4:00-5:00pm
Mr. Exie Abola
An introduction to Shakespearean comedy and historical dramatic works, with emphasis on the texts as poetical drama; historical and biographical materials will be used where relevant.

LIT 191.7 THE DEVELOPMENT OF FICTION
SAT, 8:00-11:00am
Mr. Danilo Francisco Reyes
A reading course on representative fictionists and their selected novels and short stories. It presents a historic-literary survey of major issues in fiction studies and the fundamental debates, arguments, problems, and achievements in this genre.
 
LIT 191.25: LITERATURE & IDEAS I: DETECTING CRIME FICTION
FRI, 6:00-9:00pm
Ms. Liza Constantino
This course will detect the various forms of crime fiction, reveal the controversies over origins and generic hybridity, and contextualise crime fiction against racist, feminist, and post-colonialist charges.  Primary texts will include works from Agatha Christie, Elizabeth George, Raymond Chandler, Tony Hillerman, Sara Paretsky, Jorge Luis Borges, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Jasper Fforde. Postgraduate students will be expected to read at a higher level, drawing from critical essays from Tzevetan Todorov, Stephan Knight, Leonard Cassuto, Hernández Martín, Johnson Gosselin, Martz and Higgie, and Jon Thompson.
 
LIT 192.2/FA 103.2: CREATIVE WRITING II: POETRY
WED, 2:00-5:00pm (4 slots only)
Mr. Carlomar Daoana
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished poet. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.
 
LIT 192.6/FA 136.1: THE DEVELOPMENT OF DRAMA
TTH, 2:00-3:30pm (4 slots only)
Mr. Glenn Mas
An introduction to playwrights and representative plays from Classical Antiquity to the Contemporary era. Works by the likes of Sophocles, Kiyotsugu, Marlowe, Shakepeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Shaw, Beckett, Duras, and David Henry Huang are discussed, taking into account the theatrical and symbolic aspects of the plays.
 
LIT 193.23/FA 114.2: WRITING SEMINAR: DRAMA
WED, 9:00-12:00nn (4 slots only)
Mr. Glenn Mas
This is a workshop course where original works of students are critically discussed in small and large groups under the guidance of an instructor who is an accomplished playwright. Topics pertinent to the students’ development as writers will be discussed, specifically why they write and what they hope to achieve by writing. The process encourages philosophical reflection for which theory and poetics will be re/introduced.