Publications

2020

Global Water Shortages: A Philippines Case Study

By Tan, Rosalina Palanca

Global Water Shortages: A Philippines Case Study 

Rosalina Palanca-Tan
Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines

Estimating Residential Water Demand in a Relocation Area with Inadequate Piped Water System

By Tan, Rosalina Palanca

Estimating Residential Water Demand in a Relocation Area with Inadequate Piped Water System

Rosalina Palanca-Tan

Localized disaster risk management index for the Philippines: Is your municipality ready for the next disaster?

By Ravago, Majah-Leah V.

Pubslished at the International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction (Volume 51, December 2020)

Does quality of electricity matter? Household-level evidence from the Philippines

By Ravago, Majah-Leah V.

Does quality of electricity matter? Household-level evidence from the Philippines
Vanessa Mae Pepino, Majah-Leah V. Ravago, Karl Jandoc

Published at the Journal of Asia Pacific Economy 

Opportunities in ASEAN-EU economic cooperation

By Paderon, Marissa Maricosa A.

Paderon, Marissa Maricosa A. (2020).  “Opportunities in ASEAN-EU economic cooperation”, International Economics and Economic Policy, 17, 783-798, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, https://doi.org./10.1007/s10368-020-00473-3

Bargaining Leverage in Family Planning: A Gender-based Analysis of Filipino Couples’ Reproductive Choices

By Bautista, Cristina Manalo

Published at the International Journal for Studies on Children, Women, Elderly and Disabled People, Vol 9, January 2020

ABSTRACT

At the heart of the Philippines’ population problem is the high fertility rate among low-income households. The country’s total fertility rate remains the highest in Southeast Asia, averaging 2.7 births per woman as of 2017. Numerous studies have established the positive association between poverty and large family size. Most economic studies point to inadequate women’s education and lack of access or ineffective use of family planning methods as the main reasons behind high fertility. Less studied is the effect of the distribution of “power” or influence between the spouses. This research examined the problem using the collective household model as theoretical framework. The model recognizes individual preferences of spouses, thereby allowing a gender-based analysis of intrahousehold decision-making. This research utilized the 2003 Philippine national demographic data because, to date, this is the only survey where men were surveyed separately from women on a national scale, with a data subset of matched husbands and wives. The method of analysis employed independent multinomial probit regression, utilizing three dependent variables representing three categories of family planning based on the level of involvement of one or both spouses. These are (1) women-only methods, (2) couple-participation method, and (3) irreversible methods that required consent of both spouses. The econometric results reveal the gender-based differences in the way some power-related factors affected the probability of the man or the woman using certain types of family planning method: (1) support from extended family lowers the probability of using women-only contraception; (2) women’s discussion of family planning with other people—which can indicate some social capital—raises the probability of family planning use across categories; (3) exposure to family planning media messages affects men and women differently; and (4) difference in the couple’s education matters only in the use of women-based contraception. Interestingly, in contrast to the finding on women, the men’s discussion of family planning did not appear as a significant factor in the use of any type of family planning method.

Key words: intrahousehold bargaining; collective household model; family economics; family planning; fertility

Possible Effects of China's Belt and Road Initiative on Philippine Trade and Investments

By Paderon, Marissa Maricosa A.

Marissa Maricosa A. Paderon and Ricardo B. Ang III (2020). "Possible Effects of China's Belt and Road Initiative on Philippine Trade and Investments", Philippine Journal of Development, 44 (2017), 37-50, https://pids.gov.ph/publications/7107

Updates of Empirical Estimates of Marxian Categories: The Philipines 1961–2012

By Venida, Victor S.

Published at Social Transformations: Journal of the Global South Vol. 8, No. 1, May 2020

ABSTRACT 

The economics of developing countries have a dualist structure in which feudal and capitalist modes coexist and interact. For the Philippines, this dualism is evident. This paper analyzes the Philippines's economic structure through a theoretical framework that draws on a Marxian theory interpreted by Woldd (1977, 1979): the model of social disarticulation and the creation of relative surplus value. Adding on to estimates for 1961-2000 for further analysis, this paper updates the estimated Marxian categories for the Phlippines using the Input-Output tables from 1961 to 2012 and the formal model used by Venida (2007,2011). Results of the estimates show labor productivity improvements from 2000 to 2012, which point to the possibility that the Philippine economy could have begun to transition to further capitalist expansion. 

Keywords: input-output, labor productivity, Marxian theory, Philippines, relative surplus value